An Explosion of Colour Instead of Dull Grey Concrete

Photo Gallery of the Street Art bienal design 2015 Project in Florianópolis, Brazil

This post is special. For us it’s not the norm to publish two unrelated street art posts, one after the other. Nor have we ever before published a whole gallery showing only one single street art project!

As with most street art we came to this one by pure chance. Funnily enough: we got lost driving around Ilha Santa Catarina, the island of Florianópolis. [Yes, Yasha always likes to say “We’re not lost – we have nowhere we have to be.” I like to disagree.] On that day we wanted to go to the south of the island, but we missed a turn due to road works and were heading north towards the city centre of Florianópolis instead.

Once I realised our mistake, I reset our GPS and had to do a U-turn a few hundred metres down the highway at a specially built turning bay. On our way back in the right direction we came to an overpass. Yasha noticed the street art below and pointed it out to me. Immediately, I looked for a way to get off the highway to stop and take photos.

As soon as I parked Berta and looked at the wall, I realised that we had found something special. This isn’t a small street art object – this is an extensive work in very vivid colours, stretching over more than hundred metres.

This is the *full* street art wall on this overpass in Florianópolis. Of course, on this scale details blur fairly quickly.

This is the *full* street art wall on this overpass in Florianópolis. Of course, on this scale details blur fairly quickly.


This is part of the street art wall - it gives a bit better impression.

This is part of the street art wall – it gives a bit better impression.


And again, a narrower angle shot of the same wall - now you can make out more elements of this amazing street art project!

And again, a narrower angle shot of the same wall – now you can make out more elements of this amazing street art project!

Within it you see what appear to be normal tags next to exquisite motifs of similar size – countless individual pieces flowing into each other to form one giant explosion of bright colours. Yet, at the same time, some sections stand out due to their very individual style.
Click thumbnails below for a larger images!

Once I started to walk along the wall, taking pictures of motifs that stood out, I realised that this work was far more complex than it appeared to be on first impression. There are elements connecting individual sections in such a way that you really have to look twice (or thrice).

For example, roughly in the middle you find a change from orange yellowish tones to blue; a fish in this part is half executed in orange-yellow, half in blue shades – even the way the fish is painted differs from one half to the other, although it’s clearly a connecting element.

You also see fish or birds forming part of faces. The faces are clearly there, the animals are also clearly visible…

After the faces of section 12 there is a bit of wall with the credits. To some people this list of street artists will mean a lot...

After the faces of section 12 there is a bit of wall with the credits. To some people this list of street artists will mean a lot…

When I came to the furthest end of the wall I found a long ‘credit’ section, which explained

  • the complexity of this street art project (that a large group of artists created it)
  • the quality of this street art.

This wall, in a prominent place along the route from the airport into the city of Florianópolis, was created during the Bienal Brasileira de Design , an all-encompassing bi-annual design symposium which was held in Florianópolis in 2015.

Graffiti (alongside topics like graphic design, furniture, general 3D-design) was part of the symposium’s program. Unfortunately, with my non-existent Portuguese, I was unable to find out more about this particular street art project. If you are curious please follow the link or google yourself…

The supports of the overpass on the other side of where traffic moves under it. They are also covered in street art - each with two individual pieces (one each side). Here 5 of the 6 looking in direction of the city centre (the other one didn't fit into the lens frame).

The supports of the overpass on the other side of where traffic moves under it. They are also covered in street art – each with two individual pieces (one each side). Here 5 of the 6 looking in direction of the city centre (the other one didn’t fit into the lens frame).



The left side of the wall under the overpass. Note the play with elements in the blue face on the right, where the face is part of the body of a fish with another fish forming the right eye.

The left side of the wall under the overpass. Note the play with elements in the blue face on the right, where the face is part of the body of a fish with another fish forming the right eye.

This is the opposite side of the overpass, as seen from a road which doesn't get much traffic. As you see, the grey concrete is still attracting some tagging and street art - just not in such an all-encompassing way.

This is the opposite side of the overpass, as seen from a road which doesn’t get much traffic. As you see, the grey concrete is still attracting some tagging and street art – just not in such an all-encompassing way.

Google maps location: -27:38.87489, -48:31.25313

Google maps location: -27:38.87489, -48:31.25313

Street Art is a public art form now celebrated all over the world. In Florianópolis, Brazil, we discovered a large wall of an overpass which was collectively created by a team of artists as part of the Bienal Brasileira de Design 2015. It's an explosion of colours, blending together different styles of graffiti to form one complex piece of urban art to enhance an otherwise grey and dull concrete structure.

Pin this for later reading!

 

I won’t ask you what your favourite section of this StreetArt wall is – personally, I find this too difficult to decide.
But what do think of it in general?
Is it an enhancement of the urban landscape?
Do you think that this “explosion of colour instead of dull grey concrete” is an improvement on an otherwise ugly overpass?
Or do you find it a distraction, even an ‘eyesore’?


 
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Find Michael Palin‘s ‘Brazil’ on AMAZON !
[ Affiliate link – but you won’t pay a Cent more. Thank you for your support! ]
 
 

Juergen

webmaster, main photographer & driver, second cook and only husband at dare2go.com. Freelance web designer with nearly 20 years of experience at webbeetle.com.au

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15 Responses

  1. Gina Gomez says:

    Art is truly beautiful and amazing it captures everyone attention and transformed our emotions. I do like to draw but I rather chose to watch this beautiful street art, it’s kinda amazing. Thanks for sharing your photos. This really brings happiness to my beautiful face. Please keep on blogging.

  2. Indrani says:

    Mind blowing! How creative! Hats off to the artists!
    We have something similar here, I must get down to picture these.
    The whole area looks wonderful with such work.

  3. Don’t you love it when you happen upon something quite by accident. Lovely pics.

  4. Marcia says:

    I love the ‘credits’ page. Most times, we never get to ‘meet’ the artists.
    I always think color or an explosion of it is definitely an improvement over dull grey concrete.

    • Juergen says:

      I agree with you: the clear ‘credits’ section was quite informative. Although: street artist almost always tag their piece somewhere…

  5. Amazing murals. I especially like the ones under the highway.

  6. I learned in South Africa that it’s not always a good idea to get lost in a somewhat dicey area. Luckily I got off unharmed. Thanks for letting me participate to enjoy this street art gallery. It’s extraordinary! #TPThursday

    • Juergen says:

      We usually go by gut feeling. We face the situation daily that we have to find overnight places in unknown regions – if a site doesn’t feel right we move on quickly. So far this has served us well. Since we are travelling in our own truck we hardly ever face situations where we have to walk through dicey parts of town…

  7. Corinne says:

    Juergen, I personally love it when the city council decides to let street artists use the bridge supports, blank walls, and other very ugly and boring surfaces for their canvases. I think it’s especially great if they have the forethought to have a theme, but either way it’s certainly helps beautify the area, highlight local artists, and bring a community together. Sometimes getting lost lets you find the coolest things!

    • Juergen says:

      I completely agree with you, Corinne. The other bonus seems to be that it reduces ‘graffiti’ as in ‘tagging’. I have to confess: despite GPS we get lost quite frequently – missing a turn, falling for these weird left turns in South America (where you have to be in the far right lane to turn left), and so on…

  8. jan says:

    It is a huge display of street art. I like the green patch with men wearing hats and differing expressions – cool! I don’t mind getting lost as long as I’m not in a hurry. :)
    PS I read the interesting story of Berta’s.

    • Juergen says:

      The section you’re talking about stands out as an individual piece, as does the shark on the ‘Beach Closed’. I liked both, but once I discovered the intricacies of the rest I wasn’t sure anymore which part is the best. Thanks for sharing Berta’s story ;)

  9. Ruth says:

    I saw a lot of street art when I visited Rio de Janeiro. Therefore, I am not surprised you guys found this project in the southern part of the country. I enjoy your posts a lot. They give me way more desire to travel and explore. Keep up the good work!

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