Street Art from Buenos Aires and Nearby Towns

We travel slowly and often without a plan. Things sometimes unfold as one recommendation leads to another. We had no clear plan to return to Buenos Aires when we published our article “Why is there so little StreetArt in Argentina?” . But as we were coming closer to the city, and Christmas was closing in on us, it slowly evolved as an idea to spend the holiday weekend in this city.

StreetArt in Argentina: a gallery of colourful pieces photographed in Buenos Aires and Gualeguaychu. This small stencil art decorates the facade of a shop.

StreetArt in Argentina: a gallery of colourful pieces photographed in Buenos Aires and Gualeguaychu. This small stencil art decorates the facade of a shop.

San Telmo is famous for Tango, which explains why you find a tango scene mural on the wall of a school.

San Telmo is famous for Tango, which explains why you find a tango scene mural on the wall of a school.

It proved to be a good idea as the city was much quieter than probably any other time of the year. We were able to wander through almost deserted streets. All the shops were closed, shutters firmly down and locked into place. This revealed some street art one would otherwise only discover late at night.

So here is our second gallery of StreetArt from Argentina. We spent most of our time in the centre and around the market of San Telmo . If we had consciously looked for street art we should have included suburbs like Palermo, which has a reputation for it and is often featured on other blogs. Here you see mostly pieces we stumbled upon while walking the streets, admiring Buenos Aires’ beautiful, old architecture.

A considerable number of the pieces were photographed in a single street: Calle Libertad, which runs parallel to the wide Avenida 9 de Julio. It’s not the most salubrious street, but it is home to countless small gold and jewellery shops. The roller shutters of almost every one was decorated with street art. I have never taken so many photos of different motifs in such a short time…

When we left Bs.As., on our way to Fray Bentos in Uruguay , we stayed in the small town of Gualeguaychu for a couple of days. This is a rather sleepy little place on the bank of a sidearm of Rio Uruguay. It was established as a port town but never had much success because the mouth of the river needs constant dredging. Some of the remaining old waterfront sheds were decorated with interesting street art.

At least we can now say that some regions of Argentina have more street art than others. Which only leaves us wondering why we saw so little in the west of the country…

StreetArt in Argentina: 'Suerte' (luck) on a small weir in Gualeguaychu. 'Suerte' is often used as short 'good bye' in South America.

StreetArt in Argentina: ‘Suerte’ (luck) on a small weir in Gualeguaychu. ‘Suerte’ is often used as short ‘good bye’ in South America.

Juergen

webmaster, main photographer & driver, second cook and only husband at dare2go.com. Freelance web designer with nearly 20 years of experience at webbeetle.com.au

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22 Responses

  1. I travel for street art! Love it that there’s a lot in Argentina. Never been there yet, and I’m looking forward to visit next year.

  2. Nikki says:

    I LOVE street art. These are great! Going to share on Twitter :-)

  3. swapna says:

    What is it about street art that sucks us in? I’m a sucker for em too! Would love to see your posts in the Practical Mondays Link Up:)

    (B.T.W. we are heading to Buenos Aires this April!)

    • Juergen says:

      Enjoy Buenos Aires – the city has a lot to offer, not only amazing street art (that’s only the icing on the cake)!
      Our only advice: beware of the ‘friendly’ pickpockets who offer to clean bird droppings of your clothes!

  4. shobha says:

    This street art seems very detailed. Others I’ve seen (for example here in London) the images are more large sweeps of colour like an oil painting, less details shown like in a drawing. visiting from #wkendtravelinspiration

    • Juergen says:

      If you keep your eyes open you will find some outstanding street art in Europe too. The difference can be if it was an officially sanctioned piece (fine detail) or illegally applied (broad sweeps of colour, often spray-painted).

  5. Rhonda Albom says:

    What fun. I am a big fan of street art, and hoping to get to Argentina this year. I love this collection of photos and I am glad you found so much.

    • Juergen says:

      I found way more and had to cut down the number of photos to publish. There weren’t quite enough for 2 posts, too many for one.

  6. Kate says:

    I am a big street art fan, I took a class on it in University in London. Would love to visit Buenos Aires. Lovely piece, I enjoy your writing as well :)

    • Juergen says:

      Thanks Kate, for your educated interest and the compliment on my writing… [blush] Bs.As. is certainly worth a visit.

  7. Some really awesome street art here. I will share this on twitter.

  8. brianmayroam says:

    I love that city!

  9. I am a huge fan of street art, and these are amazing examples of how street art enlivens an urban space.

  10. Lydia C. Lee says:

    I like the black & white face – I wonder who did that?

    • Juergen says:

      Do you mean the native face in the photo, right hand side of the 2 shops side-by-side? Zoom in, on the left hand side of the frame, and in the bottom left of the coloured edge you find “Cris Herreba Kiki”. But I can’t find anything related to that name/signature on Google.

  11. Donna Janke says:

    I love street art and this is a great collection. My favourite is the hotel. It appears that some parts of Argentina have some pretty good street art.

    • Juergen says:

      The hotel facade certainly looks the part and is well executed. I like how it shows such typical Buenos Aires scenes like the old Mercedes bus coming down the highway…

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