Travel Photo Roulette #108: DRY

Welcome to the Travel Photo Roulette, the contest for bloggers since late 2010 to show off their photography, and compete for the chance to host the next edition. Last week’s contest, “Food Markets”, was judged by Tom of Anita’s Feast . We at Dare2go.com are happy to have won the last Photo Roulette with this photo:

dare2go's winning photo of the Travel Photo Roulette #107: market day in Solola, Guatemala

dare2go’s winning entry of the Travel Photo Roulette #107: market day in Solola, Guatemala

As the winner of the “Food Markets” contest, we are now inviting submissions for edition #108 here on dare2go.com. Our topic for the

Travel Photo Roulette Contest #108: “DRY”

We are currently travelling overland in South America, and most recently we have explored the Atacama Desert and the Andean foothills of Argentina. Large parts of this region are dominated by arid or semi-arid landscapes of incredible beauty, so the chosen topic “Dry” is close to our recent experiences.
We didn’t name this contest “Arid Landscapes” but “Dry” – this should allow you to use your own imagination in interpreting the theme! Alongside the expected landscape photography you may also submit such motifs as close-ups of dried out driftwood, dried flowers or, if you possess a really “dry” sense of humour, a picture of a really dry piece of cakeSurprise us!

Our collage below is only to suggest possible examples (and to show off – lol).

Travel Photo Roulette #108 (image descriptions clockwise from top left) : Sand dunes near Fiambalá in Argentina · Deserted graveyard in the Atacama of Chile · Sand colours in the Atacama of southern Peru · Dry wood on cracked ground in Tatacama Desert of Colombia

Travel Photo Roulette #108 (image descriptions clockwise from top left) : Sand dunes near Fiambalá in Argentina · Deserted graveyard in the Atacama of Chile · Sand colours in the Atacama of southern Peru · Dry wood on cracked ground in Tatacama Desert of Colombia

Travel Photo Roulette Guidelines

  • One submission per blog, so sites that have 2+ authors only get one entry.
  • Post processing is permitted, but photo altering (i.e., using Photoshop to remove elements) is not.
  • Abstract submissions welcomed as long as it fits within the interpretation of the chosen phrase. Remember, the hosting blogger chooses the winner, so if they cannot understand the submission, you might not win!
  • Please try and keep your images medium-sized and web-optimized (see our note below)
  • If you win, keep these in mind when choosing a new theme: Keep phrases general so that all bloggers can participate. Specific items like “Eiffel Tower” should be avoided but rather made open-ended like “monuments.” For variety, it is okay to say focused things such as “monuments at night” which most of us have pictures of. Phrases can be generic ‘signs’, or abstract ‘religion’
  • Abstract thoughts are appreciated, but keep it within the realm that all readers will understand. No “Kafka-esque,” or “Overlooking Creation.”
  • Use something that is able to be interpreted by all.
  • After 1 year, themes can be reused, however new photos must be submitted.
  • No obscene pictures or phrases allowed. Suggestive phrases and photography can be accepted, but please keep it within reason.
  • Keep the ideas and photos fresh!
  • Pictures from your entire portfolio are fair to submit. You do not have to take the photo within the week of the contest period to submit it.
  • Most importantly, all photographs must be your own.
  • One last rule, since this is a competition for travel and photography bloggers, you must have a travel/photography blog to enter. Sorry!

How to submit your entry

To enter in the Travel Photo Roulette competition simply leave a comment below with:

  • a link to the image (whether Flickr, 500px, Trover, Smugmug, etc. or your own site) and
  • a short description / background of what’s happening in your photo.

I will upload your photo into the post. Please don’t forget to provide a brief description or caption for the photo so the viewers understand the background.

ATTENTION – image sizes: our responsive theme is, on large resolution screens, rather wide (up to 1380px incl sidebar)! Standard image width for all our posts is 1024 pixels. I will accept images of minimum 800 pixels width, submissions any smaller will probably lose quality when inserted in the page.
Please don’t submit full-size images of several megabytes with no compression applied! We are on the road with only mobile internet access and cannot download these…

Check back here throughout the week to see all the entries as they come in – feel free to comment on all submissions. Normally this contest runs for 7 days; as I have spent some time cleaning up and reformatting the list of previous winners, dare2go’s contest will run from today, July 15th, until midnight Santiago de Chile time (UTC/GMT -4 hours) on Friday, July 24th when submissions close. We will do our best to select and announce (plus notify by email) the winner on Saturday, 25th of July. The winner will then host the next round of Travel Photo Roulette #109.

…and the WINNER is:

.
.
(imagine the drum roll and final fanfare from The Oscars)
.
.
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Tom Bartel from Travel Past 50 :

Atacama desert, Chile: ancient mud dwellings © TravelPast50.com

Atacama desert, Chile: ancient mud dwellings © TravelPast50.com

Tom will now host the next round, number 109 of the Travel Photo Roulette at travelpast50.com!

It was a difficult decision, and we want to thank everybody for their submissions. Most entries were very good, but in the end we eliminated some because we thought they took the theme “DRY” even beyond our own liberal interpretation. Others were interesting shots where sometimes only a small detail wasn’t quite right (things like framing or a lens flare).

Previous Winners

List of the previous winners and themes from 2010 to 2014. Click the link to go (mostly) directly to that entry to see some fab photographs.

  1. Nov 2010 Living the Dream: Animals
  2. Nov 2010 Skinny Backpacker: Road Signs
  3. Nov 2010 Dream a Little Dream: Street Art
  4. Dec 2010 Flashpacker HQ: Festival
  5. Dec 2010 Over Yonderlust: Landmarks
  6. Dec 2010 Don’t Ever Look Back: Beaches
  7. Jan 2011 ThePlanetD: Portraits
  8. Jan 2011 Travel with a Mate: Motion
  9. Jan 2011 Johnny Vagabond: Water
  10. Feb 2011 Ken Kaminesky: Urban
  11. Feb 2011 Travels of Adam: Friday Night
  12. Mar 2011 Itchy Feet Chronicles: The Journey
  13. Mar 2011 Brendan’s Adventures: Changing Seasons
  14. April 2011 Shutterfeet: Storytelling
  15. April 2011 10 Times One: Piousness
  16. April 2011 Beached Eskimo: Learning
  17. May 2011 Travel Junkies: Architecture
  18. June 2011 Destination World [-404-]: Transportation
  19. June 2011 Living the Dream: Paradise
  20. June 2011 Vagabond Quest: Clothes
  21. July 2011 The Unframed World: Symmetry
  22. July 2011 Beached Eskimo: Home
  23. July 2011 BackPackerBanter: Inspiration
  24. Aug 2011 WanderingTrader: Darkness
  25. Aug 2011 Finding the Universe: Tranquillity
  26. Sep 2011 Fearful Adventurer: Food
  27. Sep 2011 Adventures of a GoodMan: City
  28. Oct 2011 Globe-Trekking.com: Reflection
  29. Oct 2011 Scene With A Hart: Framing
  30. Nov 2011 Vagabond Quest: Silhouettes
  31. Nov 2011 Hecktic Travels: Music
  32. Dec 2011 Globetrotter Girls: Love
  33. Dec 2011 Man on the lam: Humor
  34. Jan 2012 My Walkabout: Winter
  35. Jan 2012 The Art of Slow Travel: Blue
  36. Feb 2012 Ten times One: Depth of the Field
  37. Feb 2012 Runaway Juno: … Digital Nomad Moment
  38. Mar 2012 Nomadbiba: Sunshine
  39. Mar 2012 Travel With Kat: Local Character
  40. April 2012 The Travel Bunny: Street Scene
  41. April 2012 Adventure Crow [-404-]: Spirit of the Country
  42. May 2012 Food Travel Bliss [-404-]: Evening
  43. May 2012 Matt Gibson: Adventure
  44. May 2012 Flashpacker HQ: Once In A Lifetime
  45. July 2012 Dusty Main: Surreal
  46. Aug 2012 2away: Smile

    1. Aug 2012 Bridges & Balloons: Splendour…
    2. Sep 2012 The GypsyNester: What the ?!
    3. Oct 2012 Runaway Juno: Sweet
    4. Nov 2012 GQ Trippin: Play
    5. Nov 2012 Life’s Little Victories: Friendship
    6. Dec 2012 Breakaway Backpacker: Face
    7. Jan 2013 Fly, Icarus, Fly: Serendipity
    8. Feb 2013 Travel Transmissions: Lost in Thought
    9. Feb 2013 Wanderlusters: The Natural World
    10. Mar 2013 Travel Junkies: Patterns
    11. April 2013 Living the Dream: Your First Time
    12. May 2013 Getting Stamped: The Sun Goes Down
    13. June 2013 The GypsyNester: Cheesy Tourist Diversions
    14. June 2013 Boomeresque: Revolution
    15. July 2013 Breakaway Backpacker: Colorful
    16. Aug 2013 Around This World: Mountains
    17. Aug 2013 Passports & Pamplemousse Hands at Work
    18. Sep 2013 TurtlesTravel Dance
    19. Sep 2013 Keep calm and travel The Sea
    20. Sep 2013 Travel Photo Discovery: The Market
    21. Oct 2013 Am I Nearly There Yet?: Travel Fails
    22. Oct 2013 The GypsyNester: Weird Regional Foods
    23. Nov 2013 Sophie’s World: Trees
    24. Nov 2013 SHOuTography: Party
    25. Dec 2013 Adventures of a Goodman: Ruin
    26. Dec 2013 Have Blog Will Travel: Light
    27. Jan 2014 This World Rocks: Crowds
    28. Jan 2014 Travel Past 50: Competition
    29. Feb 2014 The Working Traveller: Working
    30. Mar 2014 Travels with Carole: Umbrellas
    31. April 2014 Independent Travel Help Quirky
    32. April 2014 Quit Job Travel World Statues
    33. May 2014 Nomad is Beautiful People Sleeping
    34. May 2014 Backpack Me: Mouthwatering
    35. June 2014 20 Years Hence: The Face of A Nation
    36. July 2014 Two for the Road: Into the Wild
    37. July 2014 TurtlesTravel: Summer!
    38. Aug 2014 Adventures Around Asia: Candid
    39. Aug 2014 Travel with Kevin and Ruth: Hiking
    40. Sept 2014 Till The Money Runs Out: Transport
    41. Sept 2014 The Crowded Planet: Wild World
    42. Sept 2014 ZigZag On Earth: The 4 Elements
    43. Oct 2014 Travel Addicts: Heritage
    44. Oct 2014 Living the Dream: Your Grand Adventure
    45. Oct 2014 Getting Stamped: Inspire
    46. Nov 2014 Flashpacker HQ: Viewpoint
This list was re-formatted by dare2go.com. If you like to use this two-column layout in your post please download the code here and follow instructions on same page.

The winners and themes in 2015. Click the link to go directly to that entry to see more fab photographs.

  1. Jan 2015 Adventures of a GoodMan: WOW!
  2. Jan 2015 ZigZag On Earth: Roads and Tracks
  3. Feb 2015 Where’s The Gos?: Street Art
  4. Mar 2015 Ice Cream and Perma Frost: Frozen
  5. Mar 2015 Journey Jottings: Detail
  6. April 2015 House Sitting Travel: What’s your Angle?
  7. April 2015 JetWayz: Spiritual Beauty
  8. April 2015 The Trading Travelers: Celebrate
  9. May 2015 Street Food World Tour: Epic
  10. May 2015 Next Stop Who Knows: Landscape
  11. May 2015 We Travel Together: Wildlife
  12. May 2015 Vagabond Way: Festival
  13. June 2015 Travel Addicts: Landmarks
  14. June 2015 TravelnLass: Wrinkles
  15. July 2015 Anita’s Feast: Food Markets

Good luck and have fun!

Juergen & Yasha from dare2go.com

Contest Submissions


Karen Warren from World Wide Writer :
Tracks in sand, Abu Dhabi’s Empty Quarter © by Karen Warren

Tracks in sand, Abu Dhabi’s Empty Quarter © by Karen Warren

You can’t get much drier than the desert! But I enjoyed exploring Abu Dhabi’s “Empty Quarter” because if you look closely enough there are all signs of activity, from tyre tracks to animal footprints. And the sand comes in all sorts of different colours.


Coen Wubbels from Landcruising Adventure :
Dried up cattle corpses in the Llanos of Colombia © Coen Wubbels of photocoen.com

Dried up cattle corpses in the Llanos of Colombia © Coen Wubbels of photocoen.com

A few months ago, we crossed Los Llanos in Colombia into Los Llanos in Venezuela and were stricken by the dryness of the place. Lots of dust trailing behind the Land Cruiser. Drought or dryness never seemed that explicit until we came across some dried up cows lying along the side of the road.


Josie from Housesitting Travel :
Sandstone sculptures in Mazzaron, Spain © Josie of housesittingtravel.com

Sandstone sculptures in Mazzaron, Spain © Josie of housesittingtravel.com

The dry climate of Mazzaron in southern Spain encourages these sandstone structures. Only the winds do their best to shape these huge sculptures, whooshing away loose parts.


Carole Terwilliger Meyers from Berkeley and Beyond :
Skull at the Mummy Museum in Guanajuato, Mexico © Carole Terwilliger Meyers

Skull at the Mummy Museum in Guanajuato, Mexico © Carole Terwilliger Meyers

This is one of the dried-out mummies in the Mummy Museum in Guanajuato, Mexico. All mummies displayed there were formerly interred in the adjacent municipal cemetery, where because of rocky ground and dry mountain air many corpses do not decompose but instead dry out (they are not wrapped like Egyptian mummies).


Tom Bartel from Travel Past 50 :
Atacama desert, Chile: ancient mud dwellings © TravelPast50.com

Atacama desert, Chile: ancient mud dwellings © TravelPast50.com

Like you, we’ve been to the Atacama and found it fascinating. We were especially interested in the recently discovered mud dwellings that were abandoned 2500 years ago when the nearby river dried up. The archeologists allow the sand to keep them covered to preserve them, only allowing the tops to show in order to hint what was once there.


Eric Schmeer from Crag Kung Fu :
Taking a moment to reflect in between sand boarding laps © Eric Schmeer from cragkungfu.com

Taking a moment to reflect in between sand boarding laps © Eric from cragkungfu.com

Taking a moment to reflect in between sand boarding laps! Edit submitted later: This is the desert oasis Huacachina in the South of Peru.


Elaine J. Masters from Trip Wellness :
Cairns at Joshua Tree Natl.Park © Elaine J. Masters

Cairns at Joshua Tree Natl.Park © Elaine J. Masters

This is an old adventure in a place that never ages, Joshua Tree National Park. The cairns drew me out of my funk created and silent reminders of the sacred presence of the high desert.


Brent Huntley from brentsfavoritephotos.blogspot.com :
Turtle Head Mountain in Red Rock Canyon, Nevada © Brent Huntley

Turtle Head Mountain in Red Rock Canyon, Nevada © Brent Huntley

This is from the summit of Turtle Head Mountain in Red Rock Canyon just outside of Las Vegas. The entire valley shows a complete lack of life due to the dryness. You can see the dry creek beds that only see water a few times a year during rain storms.


Connie Richter from Happy Richters :
Half-dry Springbok, Etosha National Park, Namibia © Connie Richter

Half-dry Springbok, Etosha National Park, Namibia © Connie Richter

Young Springbok (Antidorcas marsupialis) reflecting in the water hole at Etosha National Park in northwestern Namibia. Etosha was one of the highlights during a 40 day self drive Safari in Namibia and Botswana.


Suzanne Fluhr from Boomeresque :
At the ancient fortress of Masada, Israel © Suzanne Fluhr

At the ancient fortress of Masada, Israel © Suzanne Fluhr

This photo was taken from the ancient fortress of Masada, built on a mountain in the desert south of Jerusalem in Israel. Near this window is the breach in the fortress wall where the Romans broke through after laying siege and building a ramp up the mountainside. Part of the ramp is visible through the window. The landscape is as harsh as the history.


Leckie from Quit Job Travel World :
Sorting dried fish in the Pyapon region of Myanmar © quitjobtravelworld.com

Sorting dried fish in the Pyapon region of Myanmar © quitjobtravelworld.com

Our photo is of women sorting a mountain of dried fish at a small family run processing plant in the Pyapon region of Myanmar. This is one of about 5 mountains of dried fish in the shed, and there was a football field sized area of small shrimp drying in the sun outside. You can imagine the smell! Spending two months in Myanmar we ate A LOT of dried fish, enough that I doubt I’ll ever eat it again haha.


Shere from Shere y Paul :
Dry Don Quijote country in Consuegra, Castilla la Mancha/Spain © shereypaul.com

Dry Don Quijote country in Consuegra, Castilla la Mancha/Spain © shereypaul.com

I took this photo in Consuegra, Castilla la Mancha (Spain). This is the land of “Don Quijote”, and even though it isn’t a desert, the temperature in the summer goes up to more than 40 degrees and there’s little vegetation here.


What do you think about the submitted photos?
Which one do you like the best? Leave your comment below!

Juergen

webmaster, main photographer & driver, second cook and only husband at dare2go.com, also freelance web designer with over 18 years of experience at webbeetle.com.au

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31 Responses

  1. Karen Warren says:

    You can’t get much drier than the desert! But I enjoyed exploring Abu Dhabi’s “Empty Quarter” because if you look closely enough there are all signs of activity, from tyre tracks to animal footprints. And the sand comes in all sorts of different colours. http://www.worldwidewriter.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/sand.jpg

    • Juergen says:

      Thank you Karen, for making an early start! Here in South America we often find that, on closer inspection, the desert, which looks so untouched and ‘deserted’, displays many signs of human activities.

  2. Coen Wubbels says:

    A few months ago, we crossed Los Llanos in Colombia into Los Llanos in Venezuela and were stricken by the dryness of the place. Lots of dust trailing behind the Land Cruiser. Draught or dryness never seemed that explicit until we came across some dried up cows lying along the side of the road.

    http://www.landcruisingadventure.com/traversing-los-llanos-in-colombia/#foobox-7/0/cbw_20150225_colombia_N7128.jpg

    • Juergen says:

      Hi, Coen. Funnily enough, only last night was I thinking that our ‘liberal’ interpretation of the topic might invite some skeleton images – and here we have the first one! :D That drought must be really difficult for Colombia and Venezuela as we remember the Llanos as a very fertile region supporting large farms. And with supplies in Venezuela at breaking point…

      • Coen says:

        I have some amazing landscape sceneries, but I thought against it as would most entries be landscape like. I wanted to post something different. And yes the region supports large farms, as they do in the Brazilian Pantanal, but come end of the dry season, they are all struggling. The large dug out pools were dried up and everyone was waiting for the rains. On a side note: Venezuelan supplies are something else and special. If you have special needs, yes you might be out of luck, but I think for vegans it is no problem at all, fruits and veggies all around.

  3. Josie says:

    Hi Juergen,
    Congrats on your Photo Roulette win!
    The dry climate of Mazzaron in southern Spain encourages these sandstone structures. Only the winds do their best to shape these huge sculptures, whooshing away loose parts.
    http://www.housesittingtravel.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/Europe-2010-369.jpg
    Regards,
    Josie

    • Juergen says:

      Thank you, Josie! I love such ‘natural sculptures’. It’s amazing how centuries of constant wind can erode some of the hardest rocks – and the bizarre shapes that result.

  4. http://berkeleyandbeyond.com/skull.jpg
    This is one of the dried-out mummies in the Mummy Museum in Guanajuato, Mexico. All mummies displayed there were formerly interred in the adjacent municipal cemetery, where because of rocky ground and dry mountain air many corpses do not decompose but instead dry out (they are not wrapped like Egyptian mummies).

    • Juergen says:

      Thank you for your submission, Carole. It’s quite interesting what effect lack of moisture (= dryness) has on so many things. I must confess though the mummy museum in Guanajuato is one place we gave a miss on purpose; in part because we perceived their advertising as sensational, and in part we thought it might be too gross.

  5. Juergen says:

    Sorry to all bloggers submitting: our ‘Comment Luv’ is behaving strangely for the last 3 or 4 weeks! It only shows up on every forth or fifth post – if that! My support ticket remains unanswered and I’m at a loss to what might cause this.

    So if you get a ‘Comment Luv’ link with your comment go out and buy a lottery ticket ;)

  6. Tom Bartel says:

    Like you, we’ve been to the Atacama and found it fascinating. We were especially interested in the recently discovered mud dwellings that were abandoned 2500 years ago when the nearby river dried up. The archeologists allow the sand to keep them covered to preserve them, only allowing the tops to show in order to hint what was once there. https://travelpast50.com/ancient-dwellings-atacama-desert-chile/

    • Juergen says:

      Fascinating, we didn’t know about these! Can you tell us where exactly these are. We might find a reason to go back to San Pedro or Arica; later this year we want to drive towards Bolivia.

      • Tom Bartel says:

        Juergen, I’m not sure where these were. We had a guide for our day, and she drove us to them. I’m sure if you asked anyone in the town, though, they could tell you.

  7. Half-dry Springbok, Etosha National Park, Namibia @ Connie Richter
    Young Springbok (Antidorcas marsupialis) reflecting in the water hole at Etosha National Park in northwestern Namibia. Etosha was one of the highlights during a 40 day self drive Safari in Namibia and Botswana.

    • Juergen says:

      What a lovely photo! I love how the shadows give the dunes that extra depth and how it shows the immense size of the place… Where was this photo taken?

      • Eric says:

        Thanks! I should have included the location in my initial comment. Spaced it. I shot it in Peru. There’s a little desert oasis south of Lima called Huacachina.

        • Juergen says:

          Thanks, that was the information I was after! I suspected already that the photo was taken in Peru ;) South of Lima, ah well, I guess on a night bus it doesn’t feel that far, we drove it in our camper, with a detour into the mountains beforehand, and it was quite a way…

  8. This is an old adventure in a place that never ages, Joshua Tree National Park. The cairns drew me out of my funk created and silent reminders of the sacred presence of the high desert.

    • Juergen says:

      Thank you for your submission. That sure looks like a magical place! I have some fond memories of Nashua Tree Natl.Park.
      I’m not sure if this smaller photo might get a little lost among the other bigger ones… What do you think? If you want to send the same photo in a larger resolution (best 1024 pixels wide) I can replace it.

  9. http://brentsfavoritephotos.blogspot.com/2014/05/view-from-turtle-head-2.html

    This is from the summit of Turtle Head Mountain in Red Rock Canyon just outside of Las Vegas. The entire valley shows a complete lack of life due to the dryness. You can see the dry creek beds that only see water a few times a year during rain storms.

    • Juergen says:

      I remember Red Rock Canyon very well, we camped there a few nights in 2006 and loved it! Although: looking at your photo I don’t remember any striped mountains.

  10. As a fellow Australian I think ‘dry’ is a perfect theme.

  11. This photo was taken from the ancient fortress of Masada, built on a mountain in the desert south of Jerusalem in Israel. Near this window is the breach in the fortress wall where the Romans broke through after laying seige and building a ramp up the mountainside. Part of the ramp is visible through the window. The landscape is as harsh as the history.

    http://www.boomeresque.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/IMG_1443-e1437343614116.jpg

    • Juergen says:

      Thank you for your lovely submission, Suzanne. And yes: I have cleared out the double comments. Israel is one country both of us have never visited. I’m sure it has a lot of interesting sights, personally I’m not sure I would want to go in the current political climate…

      • None of our Israeli friends or relatives voted for Netanyahu, but they also have spent time in bomb shelters. As one of them said, “We live in a complicated neighborhood.” The “political climate” has been a mess for at least 3,000 years.

  12. Leckie says:

    Congrats on your win and a great theme! The photo of the dried up cows above is my favourite so far.

    Our photo is of women sorting a mountain of dried fish at a small family run processing plant in the Pyapon region of Myanmar. This is one of about 5 mountains of dried fish in the shed, and there was a football field sized area of small shrimp drying in the sun outside. You can imagine the smell! Spending two months in Myanmar we ate A LOT of dried fish, enough that I doubt I’ll ever eat it again haha.

    http://quitjobtravelworld.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/IMG_4002.jpg

    • Juergen says:

      Thanks for your submitted photo, Leckie. Yes, I remember the smell of dried fish too well from South East Asia. And the typical local breakfast (of all meals!) of rice with a little bit of broth and dried fish… I can stand that for lunch once in a while, but breakfast?

  13. shere says:

    I took this photo in Consuegra, Castilla la Mancha (Spain). This is the land of “Don Quijote” and even thought it isn’t a dessert, the temperatures in the summer goes up to more than 40 degrees and there’s little vegetation here.

    http://www.shereypaul.com/?attachment_id=3201

    • Juergen says:

      That could be a postcard photo, Shere! I can almost see Don Quijote riding through this countryside fighting windmills.

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